Chagall Windows

The color palette for my handwoven scarves seems to be changing lately. My scarves this spring are not as dark and muted as my previous scarves. This year the colors are lighter, somewhat pastel, but also with a smattering of jewel tones. This change may be due to the fact that here in Memphis, we experienced  unusually warm weather in March. Our azaleas, dogwood and hyacinth appeared suddenly well before the first day of spring.

 My backyard on the first day of Spring

And so in March I have been weaving lightweight scarves that can be worn year round as I prepare for the Spring Show.

Post Card for the Spring Show

Once again our collective of local artists and craftsmen will be exhibiting and selling our work at the Shops of Saddle Creek in Germantown, TN – a location that has worked well for us the past two years. Beside my handwoven scarves, I plan to sell more of my handbound books including  blank books made from 45 rpm vinyl records. And this year, there will be some Elvis sightings. But I digress. Here is the color palette that I have been working on with this most recent series of scarves.

Handwoven scarves for the Spring Show

I’ve seen these colors somewhere before. And I am reminded of a trip I took recently to the Art Institute of Chicago. One of the “must sees” that I had planned on this visit were the series of 3 “America Windows” that Marc Chagall created for the American Bicentennial.

I will need to weave more  blue scarves.

Hot Off the Press

It’s here! Lark Books’ latest book in the 500 series, 500 Judaica, was just delivered to me yesterday. And it is just lovely. I feel honored to be included in this beautiful visual collection of works by global artists and craftspeople who  create ritual objects for Jewish worship.

500 Judaica - Innovative Contemporary Ritual Art from Lark Crafts, a division of Sterling Publishing Co.

Four of my original design handwoven prayer shawls were selected for inclusion in this book.

Kol Nidre

Asher

The design and colors of Asher were inspired by the stained glass window of the same name by Marc Chagall.  It is one of a series of windows, Jerusalem Windows, installed at the Hadassah-Hebrew Medical Center in Jerusalem.

Marc Chagall's stained glass window, Asher

Tribute to Ruth and Old Jerusalem

Tribute to Ruth on the left includes some handspun yarn that I inlaid into the atarah, or neckband. I created this tallit in honor of the Book of Ruth.  Ruth was recorded as the first convert to Judaism, and she was the great-grandmother to King David. Old Jerusalem on the right of this page had been previously selected to be included in the exhibit “Best of Tennessee Craft” at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville.

The book is extremely well done.  And certainly not because of my pieces.  The photographs are all lovely and all craft media are represented here:  wooden arks (which house the Torah scrolls), silver kiddush cups, gold mezuzot, ceramic seder plates, glass Shabbat candlestick holders, bronze and copper jewelry, paper ketubot (marriage certificate) with hand printed calligraphy, a beautifully embroidered huppah for a wedding ceremony.  One not familiar with the beauty of Jewish ritual and worship will also learn quite a bit from the handcrafted objects used not only in a Jewish congregational  service, but also in the more intimate setting of a Jewish household.

And yes, 500 Judaica is available now and can be ordered here.